Session One lesson 4

Lesson Four

4.3 Warm Up: Ball Toss. The goal is to keep the ball in play.

  • A 12-14" soft, plastic ball is recommended.

  • Begin in a circle, standing or sitting in a neutral position. Standing is preferred. Remember the goal is to be safely challenged.

  • The exercise is silent.

  • Begin tossing and catching the ball without talking until the exercise comes to a natural conclusion or the ball is dropped. Repeat.

Group discussion: Why or why weren't we successful? Why do you think the stated guidelines are "The exercise is silent"? What other ways of communication did the group use? How focused was the group on achieving the goal?

  • If the group achieved the first goal, add a well known passage to the exercise (Pledge of Allegiance, etc.).

  • One word is spoken as the ball is tossed. The goal then becomes to say the complete passage while keeping the ball in play.

Group discussion: If you increased your cognitive load by adding a well known passage, compare the difference. Reminder: the ability to toss and catch with ease MUST be achieved before adding a second task. https://qz.com/722661/neuroscientists-say-multitasking-literally-drains-the-energy-reserves-of-your-brain/


4.8 Blocking

Blocking is the term used describe the precise movement of actors on stage. Using the areas of the stage illustrated below, participants will learn to fine tune spatial awareness and physical perception by grounding themselves in a universal layout which can be applied to any locale. Stage direction is from the perspective of the actor looking out to the audience, in this case the perspective of the participant. The goal is to familiarize participants with the areas of a stage.


AUDIENCE

downstage left

downstage

downstage right

centerstage left

centerstage

centerstage right

upstage left

upstage center

upstage right

  • Designate a specific space with determined parameters. Set this up as the exercise area.

  • Facilitator directs participants to move to specific areas.

  • Participants stay in the area as others move to a spot.

  • Participants pay attention to what is noticed or observed in the playing area.


4.9 Moving Through The Space

Designate a specific space with determined parameters. Set this up as the exercise area. **CAUTION If you are dizzy or feel unstable with eyes closed, when the facilitator says "Stop", position yourself by a chair or table. Allowing a stationary object to come in contact with your body when eyes are closed helps alleviate insecurity or dizziness. The goal is to recognize internal awareness.

Facilitator instructs participants to :

  1. "Begin to walk freely within the parameters." Approximately 20 seconds.

  2. "Stop (standing or sitting) in a neutral position. Close your eyes." **

  3. "Focus on internal awareness and momentarily place a hand on the area where you feel your presence." 20-30 seconds.

  4. "Release your hand to your side. Open your eyes and walk through the space again and slow your pace and shorten your stride." 20 seconds.

  5. Repeat steps 2 and 3

  6. "Open your eyes and walk through the space with a comfortable stride."

  7. "Slow your pace and lengthen your stride."

  8. Repeat steps 2 and 3. Make a mental note of any difference.

  9. "Open your eyes and begin to walk through the space with a comfortable stride. Now alter your pace and stride to your preference."

  10. "Stop (standing or sitting) in a neutral position. Close your eyes." ** Place a hand on the area where you feel your presence.

Skills Developed/Enhanced: internal presence awareness.

Journal Response: Was it easy or difficult to locate the area in your body where you feel present? When eyes were open, where did your gaze rest? Did gaze change when you changed your stride? How? What unnecessary muscle tension did you have? Notes: